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29 July 2010

Technicals vs. Fundamentals

Technicals vs. Fundamentals: Which are Best When Trading Crude Oil and Natural Gas?

July 26, 2010

If "fundamentals" drive trend changes in financial markets, then shouldn't the same factors have consistent effects on prices?

For example: Positive economic data should ignite a rally, while negative news should initiate decline. In the real world, though, this is hardly the case.
On a regular basis, markets go up on bad news, down on good news, and both directions on the same news -- almost as if to say, "Talk to the hand cuz the chart ain't listening."
Unable to deny this fly in the fundamental ointment, the mainstream experts often attempt to reconcile the inconsistencies with phrases like "shrugged off," "defied" or "in spite of."
That begs the next question: How do you know when a market is going to cooperate with fundamental logic and when it won't? ANSWER: You don't.
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Take, for instance, the first three news items below regarding the July 22 performance in crude oil, versus the fourth headline, which occurred on July 23:
  1. Crude prices surge nearly 4% in their sharpest one-day percentage gain since May. The rally was "aided by fears that Tropical Storm Bonnie will enter the Gulf of Mexico over the weekend and disrupt oil production." (Wall Street Journal)
  2. "Oil Prices Soar As Gulf Storm Threat Looms" (Associated Press)
  3. "The storm should keep oil prices bubbling if it continues to strengthen and remain on track." (Bloomberg)
vs.
  1. "Oil Slips From Surge Despite Storm Threats" (Commodity Online)
Unlike fundamental analysis, technical analysis methods don't rely on the news to explain or predict market moves. They look at the markets' internals instead.
Get FREE access to Elliott Wave International's most intensive forecasting service for the global Energy markets. Now through noon Eastern time July 28, you can get timely intraday charts, forecasts and analysis for Crude Oil and Natural Gas. You'll also get daily, weekly and monthly analysis and forecasts for all major Energy markets and Energy ETFs. Access FreeWeek now.

23 July 2010

'Day of Reckoning' Looms

Quadrillion Dollar Debt: 'Day of Reckoning' Looms
What Will Happen as $1,000,000,000,000,000 in Global Debt Winds Down?July 22, 2010

By Elliott Wave International

The biggest balloon in the world is deflating.
This balloon had been inflated with a quadrillion (1015) dollars, which is to say: This balloon was filled not with air but with debt from around the globe.
What will happen as this global debt winds down? In two words: Deflationary Depression -- the likes of which could be unprecedented in history.
Want to Know How to Prosper in a Deflationary Depression?
If you haven't yet given Robert Prechter's deflation argument your full attention, you should know now that 
yesterday was the best time to do so. Download Prechter's 60-Page Guide to Understanding Deflation here.
thousand trillion in debt can't be wished away or swept under the rug. No one can "forgive" the debt. The consequences of unwinding this debt could be as massive as the dollar figure itself.
We've heard plenty about the debt problems of Greece, Spain, Portugal and Italy.
But how about the world's second largest economy? Consider this fact reported in the Japan Times (July 8):
"Japan's government debts are the highest the world has ever seen, at 219 percent of gross domestic product, according to the International Monetary Fund."
Then there's the world's sixth largest national economy. In January 2009,  Robert Prechter wrote this in theElliott Wave Theorist:
"British banks have amassed $4.4 trillion worth of foreign liabilities, twice Britain's annual GDP. ... England, moreover, 'has not defaulted since the Middle Ages.' The possibility that it may do so again is yet another indication that the bear market is of ... (larger) degree, exactly as Elliott wave analysts have predicted all along."
Remember, Japan and Great Britain are major world economies. Imagine what the debt totals would look like in a line-item analysis of other nations, regions, states, provinces and municipalities around the world, including the U.S.
De-leveraging will likely lead to a deflationary crash -- a "day of reckoning."
How can you prepare for a deflationary crash?
To start with, keep your money safe. As Bob Prechter mentions in the June 2010 Elliott Wave Theorist:
"Investors should be primarily in greenback cash and Treasury bills."
He also describes holdings which should be strictly avoided.
Want to Know How to Prosper in a Deflationary Depression?If you haven't yet given Robert Prechter's deflation argument your full attention, you should know now that yesterday was the best time to do so. Download Prechter's 60-Page Guide to Understanding Deflation here.

19 July 2010

Slope of Hope

Understanding Robert Prechter's 'Slope of Hope'

July 19, 2010

By Elliott Wave International

Almost everybody who follows financial markets has heard about climbing the "wall of worry": the time when prices head up bullishly, but no one quite believes in the rally, so there's more worry about a fall than a rise.
What's the opposite condition in the market?
Bob Prechter named it the "slope of hope," meaning that as prices head down, no one wants to believe the market really has turned bearish, so there's more hope for a rise than fear of a fall.
Want to Know How to Prosper in a Deflationary Depression?If you haven't yet given Robert Prechter's deflation argument your full attention, you should know now that yesterday was the best time to do so. Download Prechter's 60-Page Guide to Understanding Deflation here.
The market has been rising recently, following a bearish decline from late April through the end of June, which makes now the perfect time to learn more about the slope of hope.
* * * * *
Excerpted from The Elliott Wave Theorist by Robert Prechter, published June 18, 2010
According to polls, economists are virtually unanimous in the view that the “Great Recession” is over and a recovery is in progress, even though “full employment will take time,” etc. Yet mortgage writing has just plunged to a new low for the cycle (see Figure 1), and housing starts and permits just had their biggest percentage monthly drop since January 1991, which was at the end of a Primary-degree recession. But the latest “recession” supposedly ended a year ago. How can housing activity make new lows this far into a recovery? The answer is in the subtitle to Conquer the Crash, which includes the word depression. The subtleties in economic performance continue to suggest that it “was” not a “recession.” It is a depression, moving forward, in punctuated fashion, slowly but inexorably.
Number of New Mortgages Plunges Again
Despite this outlook, keep in mind what The Elliott Wave Theorist said last month: “Even though the market is about to begin its greatest decline ever,the era of hope is not quite finished.” For as long as another year and a half, there will be rallies, fixes, hopes and reasons to believe in recovery. Our name for this phase of a bear market is the Slope of Hope. This portion of the decline lasts until the center of the wave, where investors stop estimating upside potential and start being concerned with downside potential. Economists in the aggregate will probably not recognize that a depression is in force until 2012 or perhaps beyond. That’s the year the 7.5-year cycle is due to roll over (see April 2010 issue). Stock prices should be much lower by then, but optimism will still dominate, and it will show up in the form of big rallies and repeated calls of a bottom.
Want to Know How to Prosper in a Deflationary Depression?If you haven't yet given Robert Prechter's deflation argument your full attention, you should know now that yesterday was the best time to do so. Download Prechter's 60-Page Guide to Understanding Deflation here.

05 July 2010

the Long Decline Ahead: 20 Questions with Robert Prechter

20 Questions with Robert Prechter: Long Decline Ahead

July 2, 2010

By Elliott Wave International

The following article is an excerpt from Elliott Wave International’s free report, 20 Questions With Deflationist Robert Prechter. It has been adapted from Prechter’s June 19 appearance on Jim Puplava’s Financial Sense Newshour.
Jim Puplava: I want to come back to government spending, but first I want to move onto the stock market. In your last two Elliott Wave Theorist issues, you laid out a scenario that would put the Dow and S&P, which in your opinion may have peaked on April 26, as the top from here. You feel that this top is the biggest top formation of all time, a multi-century top and we could head straight down in a six-year collapse that would end in 2016 that could see a substantial portion of the S&P and the Dow wiped out in a similar way that we saw between 1929 and 1933. Let's talk about that and the reasoning behind it.
Editor’s Note: The article you are reading is just one small excerpt from Elliott Wave International’s FREE report, 20 Questions With Deflationist Robert Prechter. The full 20-page report includes even more of Prechter’s insightful analysis on fiat currency, gold, the Fed, the Great Depression, financial bubbles, and government intervention. You’ll learn how to protect your money -- and even profit -- in today's environment. Read ALL of Prechter's candid answers for FREE now. Access the free 20-page report here.
RP: Yes, you're exactly right. I did a lot of work on technical forms, cycle forms and Elliott wave forms in April and May and put them in a double issue. Let’s talk about the cycles first.
The 7¼-year cycle has been quite regular since the first bottom in 1980. The next bottom was at the crash in October 1987. The next one was November 1994, which is when the economy went through four years with lots of layoffs; it was a recessionary period throughout until that cycle bottomed. The next one was between September 2001, which was the 9/11 attack, and the October 2002 bottom. And the latest one was at the low in March 2009. All those periods are 7¼ years apart, so we are in the uptrend portion of the 7¼-year cycle.
However, notice for example that in 1987, the market went up until August of that year and then bottomed in October, just a couple of months later. So the decline occurred very, very late in the cycle. This time it occurred a little bit earlier in the cycle, topping in '07 and bottoming in '09. In the current cycle, prices should peak the earliest of all of them. It's what we in the cycle prediction business call “left-hand translation.” The market’s already gone up for about a year, and I think that's just about enough. I think we're going to spend most of the cycle going down. But the important thing to note is that the next bottom is due in 2016. That means I think we're going to have a repeat of what happened between 1930—which was the top of the rally following the 1929 crash—and the July 1932 low. Instead of taking two years, it's going to take about six years.
It's going to be a very long decline. It's going to be interrupted by many, many rallies, just as the decline from 1930 to 1932 was. And every time it bottoms and rallies, people are going to say “OK, that's enough; it's over.” But it won't be over. It's just going to be a long, long process. I think you and I will probably be talking a few times during this period. One of the interesting aspects of this process is that optimism should actually remain dominant through the first three years of the cycle. That will carry us into 2012. Even though prices will be edging lower, most people are going to think it's a buy, and you shouldn't get out of your stocks, and recovery is just around the corner, probably for the next three years. And then, for the final half of the cycle, the final three years, that's when you'll get the capitulation phase when everyone finally gives up.
Editor’s Note: The article you are reading is just one small excerpt from Elliott Wave International’s FREE report, 20 Questions With Deflationist Robert Prechter. The full 20-page report includes even more of Prechter’s insightful analysis on fiat currency, gold, the Fed, the Great Depression, financial bubbles, and government intervention. You’ll learn how to protect your money -- and even profit -- in today's environment. Read ALL of Prechter's candid answers for FREE now. Access the free 20-page report here.
This article, 20 Questions with Robert Prechter: Long Decline Ahead,was syndicated by Elliott Wave International. EWI is the world's largest market forecasting firm. Its staff of full-time analysts lead by Chartered Market Technician Robert Prechter provides 24-hour-a-day market analysis to institutional and private investors around the world.