Search This Blog

25 November 2011

a Deflationary Depression ahead


America's First Deflationary Depression: Is a Bigger One Ahead?
Social psychology precipitates economic depressions 
November 07, 2011

By Elliott Wave International

Don't blame Martin Van Buren for America's first deflationary depression. Social mood rode higher in the saddle than did our 8th President, who only stood 5' 6".
Elected in 1836, by the time Van Buren assumed office in March 1837 a speculative bubble had burst and a banking crisis was at hand (sound familiar?) -- the national mood had turned south and the "Panic of 1837" followed. Van Buren was known as "The Little Magician," but he could not pull an economic recovery out of the hat. He met defeat seeking a second term.
America's first deflationary depression lasted until 1842. Van Buren blamed over-zealous business practices and a credit bubble (sound familiar 2x?). The panic precipitated bank failures; many speculators who bought land to capitalize on railroad expansion lost everything. The depression worsened as Van Buren continued Andrew Jackson's economic policies. Businesses failed and unemployment was widespread. There were even "food riots" in several cities.
(Author's note: Because of substantial revenue inflows into the Treasury during the boom of the early 1830s, the United States government became debt free in 1835. Ironically, this was the very year the depression began. Stock prices fell sharply despite the federal government paying off all of its debt. Conventional wisdom would have us believe reducing the national debt, or paying it off entirely, would lift stock prices. It didn't happen in 1835, so there must be something else at work. That "something else" is social mood.)
The 1837-1842 deflationary depression comprised Supercycle Wave II, the end of which saw the beginning of the biggest economic expansion in history -- Supercycle wave III! The 1929-1933 Great Depression still grabs more attention, but in fact the earlier Supercycle Wave II decline set the stage for the United States becoming the greatest economic and military power the world has ever known.
President Herbert Hoover held office during the 1929 Crash and onset of the Great Depression, a.k.a. Supercycle Wave IV. Yet no U.S. President has thus far been at the helm during a Grand Supercycle market decline. The last decline of that degree had its origin in the South Sea Bubble in 1720, when Great Britain's King George I was on the throne. The rampant speculation of the time spread beyond the financial class, such that porters and ladies' maids had enough money to buy their own carriages. Members of the clergy took part in the mania. Poof! Life savings were wiped out. England's Postmaster General committed suicide. Hundreds of members of Parliament lost money. As for the directors of the South Sea Company itself, they were forced to give up their property and arrested to boot.
Martin Van Buren led the nation during our country's first Supercycle depression -- as President he was powerless to stop it. Who will occupy the Oval Office when the next Grand Supercycle depression develops? This we believe: That individual will be powerless to prevent it. He or she will only be a President.
What is more powerful than a President of the United States? The answer is "social mood." How is this powerful force shaping the economy?
Discover the answer in the 90-page Free Report called the Deflation Survival Guide.

Now is the time to prepare for a deflationary depression. Start by reading the 90-page free eBook, Deflation Survival Guide, which includes Robert Prechter's most important analysis and forecasts regarding deflation. This guide will help you survive a major deflationary trend, and even equip you to prosper.
Download your free eBook, the Deflation Survival Guide, now >>

21 November 2011

These are the Best Technical Indicators for Trading

What Are the BEST Technical Indicators for Successful Trading?
8 technical analysis tools that give any trader an edge
November 14, 2011

By Elliott Wave International

You may have seen a TV ad where "traders" describe their strategies, and one says, "I trade on fundamentals." That sounds very reassuring -- except that, on any given day, "fundamentals" are a mixed bag:
  • You might have a good U.S. employment report...but bad news from Europe
  • A positive Fed statement...but a negative housing number
  • Strong earnings...but slowing consumer spending
And so on. Which "fundamental" factor trumps the other? Which one carries more weight in your forecast? Your guess is as good (or bad) as anybody's.
Your alternative is technical analysis, which forecasts the markets' short- and long-term moves based on objective metrics, not guesses.
Here at EWI, we've always strived to help our readers learn to think for themselves. So we've put together for you a free 8-lesson report, "Best Technical Indicators for Successful Trading" that teaches you how to use these technical tools:
  1. The Personality of Elliott Waves
  2. Head and Shoulders Pattern
  3. Fibonacci Retracements
  4. Advance-Decline Line
  5. Sentiment
  6. Volume
  7. Trendlines
  8. Momentum Analysis Using MACD
Here's a small preview of this free 8-lesson report.
Trendlines

A trendline represents the psychology of the market; specifically, the psychology between the bulls and the bears. If the trendline slopes upward, the bulls are in control. If the trendline slopes downward, the bears are in control.



Moreover, the actual angle or slope of a trendline can determine whether or not the market is extremely optimistic, as it was in the upwards sloping line in Figure 1-1 or extremely pessimistic, as it was in the downwards sloping line in the same figure.

Now we're on to the fun part -- drawing trendlines. You can do this several different ways...

Finish Reading This 8-Lesson Report Today, FREE
In this free report, you will learn some of the most effective tools of the trade from analysts at Elliott Wave International, the world's largest technical analysis firm.
Find out which technical indicators are best for analyzing chart patterns, which are best for anticipating price action, even which are best for spotting high-confidence trade setups -- plus how they all complement Elliott wave analysis.
Download your "Best Technical Indicators" report now >>

05 November 2011

the Myth of Corporate Earnings being a Market Driver


Earnings: Stock Market's Brightest False Beacon
"Earnings estimators are too pessimistic at bottoms and too optimistic at tops," explains EWI's president Robert Prechter 
November 03, 2011

By Elliott Wave International

Four times a year, investors and Wall Street watch the quarterly corporate earnings reports, trying to anticipate the trend in stocks. Another earnings season is upon us right now, so read this excerpt from our free Club EWI report, "Market Myths Exposed."
"Myth No. 1 -- 'The bottom line is earnings drive stock prices' -- Investopedia.com.

"It's simply not true. The flawed notion that profits drive stock prices is something that EWI has discussed numerous times over the years. For one thing, quarterly earnings reports announce a company's achievements from the previous quarter. The trends in earnings and stock prices sometimes even move in opposite directions, such as in the 1973-74 bear market when S&P earnings rose every quarter as the S&P declined 50%. More recently, earnings have been cycling with stocks, but that still leaves the problem of reporting delays, which leave investors eating the market's dust when the trend changes.



"To try to get around this, pundits use analysts' estimates of future earnings as a guide. In doing so, however, they are subject to the same herding impulses as investors. As [Robert Prechter's] Conquer the Crash puts it, 'Earnings estimators are too pessimistic at bottoms and too optimistic at tops, just when you most need the indicator to tell the truth.'"
The S&P earnings hit a new record in Q2 of this year. This chart from our September 2011 Elliott Wave Financial Forecast puts them next to the Dow. Observe when the previous high in earnings took place:


Market Myths Exposed, a FREE ebook from Elliott Wave International, uncovers 10 of the most common misconceptions about the markets that can affect your investment decisions. Learn the truth about inflation and deflation, the FDIC, diversification, speculation and more in this 33-page eBook.
Get valuable insights you won't find anywhere else. Download your free eBook >>